Energy Hacks – Water

Energy Hacks – Water

 

Energy Hacks for a Supercharged Body: Step 1 – ‘Structured’ Water

Who isn’t tired? Good news – there are 7 easy strategies available to supercharge your body through something called ‘energy hacking’.  Energy hacking is optimizing your performance, health, and wellbeing with the help of technology and biological tools.

In a previous blog post we discussed things that drain our energy and 7 easy energy hacks to allow for abundant free-flowing energy required for optimal health and performance (http://abbeyrosefoundation.org/7-easy-energy-hacks-supercharged-body/). The first energy hack we’ll discuss is structured water.

We all learned that water or H2O is available as ice, liquid, or vapor. New research from Gerald Pollack, PhD, Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Washington shows that there is a fourth phase of water – a gel, which is referred to as EZ or structured water. In the lab, with increasing temperature, water moves from ice, to EZ, to liquid, to vapor. In the body, EZ water gel forms where water touches the surface of cells. EZ water lines all the cells of the body, turning them into batteries that fuel mitochondria (the cell’s energy generator) and turning the body into an energy grid. EZ water also stores and transmits information, much like a computer chip.

There are several easy ways to ‘charge’ water and supercharge the body.

  1. Consider the source – The earth naturally produces structured water through melting of ice and underground flow. Glacial, spring, volcanic, artesian, mineral, and sparkling waters are excellent sources of structured water. Water stored in glass retains it purity, but water stored in plastic does not.
  2. Drink chilled water – Water at about 39 degrees is closer to the EZ phase – the phase between ice and liquid,
  3. Create a vortex – the mechanical action of stirring creates a vortex and increases the formation of EZ water.
  4. Juice – Juicing puts pressure on plant cells, extracting their EZ water.
  5. Soak up the sun – Light increases water’s structure. Exposing the body to sunlight or infrared light increases the amount of structured water in the body. Exposing drinking water to sunlight increases the structure in the exposed water.
  6. Go negative – Structured water has a negative charge and exposure to negative charges enhances the amount of structured water in the body. The body is exposed to negative charges via the consumption of antioxidants (including antioxidant-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables) and grounding (e.g., by walking barefoot on the earth).
  7. Add precise energetic information to water – NES infoceuticals (http://v2.neshealth.com/nes-products/infoceuticals.aspx ) deliver precise energetic information to cells to improve their performance.

To learn more about research on the fourth phase of water and its importance to your health, view Dr. Pollack’s YouTube video at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-T7tCMUDXU .  Skeptics might find the following essay of interest https://charleseisenstein.net/essays/the-waters-of-heterodoxy-g-pollacks-the-fourth-phase-of-water/ . For all the scientific details, Gerald Pollacks research is presented in his book The Fourth Phase of Water: Beyond Solid, Liquid, and Vapor ( https://www.amazon.com/Fourth-Phase-Water-Beyond-Liquid-ebook/dp/B00N2ASKF2 ).

  •  
  •  
  •  

August Tip – Stop Using Those Retractable Leads!

August Tip – Stop Using Those Retractable Leads!

While retractable leads may seem like a good idea because they allow your pet to roam and run, they are dangerous!

A retractable lead consists of a thin cord wound around a spring-loaded device with a plastic handle. A button on the handle is used to control the amount of cord released. The button is also used to break (stop the release of more cord) and to rewind or recoil the cord so as to bring the pet in closer to the handler. The cords come in various lengths, most often 10, 16, or 26 feet. There are numerous concerns with this type of lead.

  1. The cord used in retractable leads is thin and can snap when used with a powerful or aggressively pulling dog. A snapped cord allows the dog to break lose and may recoil back, hitting the handler.
  2. The cord used in retractable leads is thin and can easily cut through skin if the dog wraps the cord around the handler, if the handler grabs a malfunctioning cord to control the dog, or if the dog wraps the cord around himself or someone he encounters as he is roaming or with whom he is playing,
  3. The long cord may put the dog too far away from the handler to properly control him, allowing the dog to run up on other people or dogs, run into the street, or get into dangerous items/substances that the handler does not see because of the distance. Because of their length, they are not suitable for use on city streets, where the pet could run-up on pedestrians or run into the street. In addition, they should not be used in confined spaces, such as a veterinarian’s office or groomer.
  4. The pet is at risk for suffering neck injuries resulting from the snap back received when running out the distance of the long cord.
  5. Some handles on retractable leads can be cumbersome and too easily dropped.
  6. The retractable lead is a mechanical devise and subject to malfunction.
  7. Some handlers have difficulty mastering the use of the button on the retractable lead and may allow the cord to extend further when their intention was to pull the dog in closer and out of danger.
Read article and watch video here: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=7058784&page=1

Read article and watch video here: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=7058784&page=1

If you still want to use a retractable lead, be sure to review the safety warnings included with the lead you purchase, know how to use the buttons on the lead, and check the lead often for frayed cords and mechanical problems.

For more information on the risks of retractable leads see:

  •  
  •  
  •  

Dog with a Job – Sometimes you just have to goof off!

Dog with a Job – Sometimes you just have to goof off!

Kota has been teaching Annie and Jake how to find wildlife, but sometimes a guy just has to take a break and have fun!

Kota is really good at finding scat and scent posts, but still needs a little work in letting me know what he found.  He’s also teaching Annie and Jake how to work with us. We work on the trails and at home almost every chance we get. On this trip Kota was pointing out coyote sign and black bear sign earlier in the day, but sometimes, you just have to goof off! Kota decided to have fun splashing the other two dogs, me, and my friend with the camera. He was running straight at us full speed through the water, then at the last second he would change direction. We were all soaked but having fun. When we got back to the buildings, he was a little upset that the humans had to use the facilities. He was letting us know by yelling his disapproval at us, and Jake decided to join in.

DWJ July 26 16 2

  •  
  •  
  •  

Dogs in Cancer Research

Dogs in Cancer Research

Research in dogs and cats with cancer may also aid in understanding human cancers.

The Morris Animal Foundation announced the launch of its Golden Retriever Lifetime Study in which 3000 dogs have been enrolled. They will be followed for at least 15 years in an attempt to identify risk factors for cancer and other diseases. Cancer is estimated to affect 60% of Golden Retrievers, but there is little good information on why and how it occurs. Owners and veterinarians of participating dogs will complete periodic questionnaires about the diet, activity, and health of the dog and provide blood samples. This and other research in cats and dogs will be used in an attempt to better understand cancer in humans. To read more about this research, go to http://caninelifetimehealth.org/  and http://www.fierceanimalhealth.com/story/vets-and-pharma-execs-gather-dc-trade-notes-pets-cancer-research/2015-06-17?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

Golden Retriever and cancer

  •  
  •  
  •  

Can Collars Cause Thyroid Damage?

Can Collars Cause Thyroid Damage?

Dog on a leashThe thyroid and salivary glands are located in the dog’s neck area. Recently, concern has been raised that these organs might be injured when sharp pressure is applied to this area by a collar. The risk is thought to be particularly high in dogs who lunge and pull when on lead. While we have not identified any documented reports of injury in this manner, those who are concerned about thyroid and salivary gland damage, particularly those whose dogs have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, might want to consider the use of a harness or ‘gentle leader’ instead of a collar when walking their dog.

Our Frankie has normal thyroid function, but can get excited and lunge when we encounter something exciting on our walks, as we did this morning when we flushed a flock of birds out of some high grass alongside the road. I think I just might switch him to a harness!

photo credit: Ask Spike

  •  
  •  
  •