The Origin of the Dog Revealed

The Origin of the Dog Revealed

New research shows that dogs were domesticated twice, in two vastly different locations.  When canine genetic data were compared with archeological evidence, it was determined that domesticated dogs emerged from two separate wolf populations that lived on opposite sides of the Eurasian continent. In other words, dogs were domesticated, independently, in both Europe and Central Asia or China! This is particularly interesting because animal domestication is rare and the odds are against it occurring in two different places.

Dog suitcase

At some point after their domestication, the eastern dogs traveled with migrating humans into Europe where they mixed with and mostly replaced the earliest European dogs. Most dogs today are a mixture of both Eastern and Western dogs.

For more information on this research see: “Genomic and archaeological evidence suggests a dual origin of domestic dogs,” ScienceDOI: 10.1126/science.aaf3161

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Healthy Dog Conference 2016 in Ohio

Healthy Dog Conference 2016 in Ohio

Healthy Dog Conference 2016 in Ohio.

A healthy dog conference will be held May 21-22 in Delaware Ohio at K9 Ponderosa. This is a great opportunity for Midwesterners to meet and hear world-renowned animal holistic health expert Wendy Volhard speak on dog nutrition, kinesiology (muscle testing), and the use of holistic approaches (Chinese Medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy) to keep your dog healthy.

Visit http://www.k9ponderosa.com/Wendy%20Volhard_May_2016.htm or https://www.facebook.com/events/1731019637127971/ for more information.

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Volhard Healthy Dog Conference April 22-24

Volhard Healthy Dog Conference April 22-24

Early registration closes March 30th for this information-packed conference in Lake Arrowhead California. The conference is designed for trainers and conscientious owners and covers topics in holistic health, nutrition, and behavior. Visit http://www.volharddognutrition.com/conferences/healthy-dog-conference-2016-california.html for more information.

Volhard 2016 Conf

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Case Study – Holistic Treatment of Adrenal Tumor

Case Study – Holistic Treatment of Adrenal Tumor

Holistic Treatment of Adrenal Tumor Leads to Complete Recovery     

Modalities: Reiki, Herbs

Rusty after his recovery

Rusty after his recovery

This case study reports on the successful use of Reiki and herbs to support a 10 ½ year old welsh terrier in his full recovery from an adrenal tumor without the use of conventional methods such as drugs or surgery. The initial diagnosis and ultimate recovery were both documented using a standard medical procedure called ultrasound imaging. Rusty’s story begins in mid 2013 when he became weak and hypertensive and was diagnosed with an adrenal tumor by his conventional veterinarian. His owners, James and Meredith, opted for holistic treatment instead of the recommended surgery. With the support of herbal remedies recommended by a naturopathic doctor and reiki provided by a Reiki Master, Rusty’s tumor dissolved! Rusty has just had his 13th birthday and is healthy, happy and active, without any evidence of an adrenal tumor.

Please read the following accounts by Rusty’s owners and Reiki Master to learn more about this case. As you review this material, please keep in mind that holistic treatments are highly personalized. For that reason, we cannot provide you with a specific combination of herbs for the treatment of adrenal tumors. Instead, we encourage you to seek the help of an holistic practitioner who can develop a program directed to the specific needs of your pet. The practitioners who contributed to this case were:

Eileen Alexander, RYT, RM

Life & Grief Coach, Reiki Master

Reiki, Yoga & Meditation Teacher

Eileen Alexander Therapeutic Services

450 Hamburg Turnpike, Suite 2C

Wayne, NJ 07470

973-600-4030

info@eileenalexander.com

www.eileenalexander.com

 

Dr. Sandi Kuglics, ND (Doctor of Naturopathy)

Health Awareness Laser Therapy

336 College Ave

Beaver, PA 15009

724-774-8515

skuglicsnd@comcast.net

 

Mary Duafala, MS, BCPP

Bioenergetic Practitioner and

Executive Director, The Abbeyrose Foundation

mary@abbeyrosefoundation.org

 

RUSTYS AMAZING RECOVERY by James and Meredith, owners

Rusty is usually very excited to go on his walks, but on the afternoon of June 30, 2013 he was unable to walk down the stairs and refused his dinner. After touching his belly, we noticed that his stomach was distended and he was extremely guarded about his stomach. We knew there was something very wrong. He also gave us “the look”. He was telling us, “This isn’t good, guys!”

Rusty 1Photo: Chelsea (L) and Rusty (R) a few days before Rusty’s diagnosis

 

We immediately took him to the vet. Upon initial external evaluation, no diagnosis could be determined. So, we left him for about an hour and a half for further testing, including an x-ray. It was determined that Rusty had gastroenteritis and high blood pressure; neither of which Rusty had ever had before. It was then noted, on one of the x-rays, that Rusty had a darkening around his right adrenal gland, pointing to the possibility of a tumor. The doctor recommended that Rusty stay for about three days to be monitored for the gastroenteritis, receive IV fluids and medications, and to receive an ultrasound on the area of the adrenal gland. (Note: There are 2 adrenal glands, one sitting on top of each of the kidneys. These glands produce a variety of hormones, including adrenaline and steroids. Ultrasound, also called sonography, uses high-frequency sound waves to view inside the body to see organs and blood flow. This is a common imaging procedure used by veterinarians and medical doctors.)

 

We received the ultrasound result after his stay, and it was showed a right adrenal gland tumor. His blood pressure remained slightly elevated, and he was slightly more agitated, primarily around unfamiliar dogs, and his abdomen was still tender. Rusty was started on a blood pressure medication.

 

We scheduled a visit with a veterinary surgeon, to do a CAT scan and to determine Rusty’s eligibility for surgery. This CAT scan was to determine the true size and impact of the tumor, and to determine if the tumor was operable. The tumor was deemed operable and the surgeon stated that the quality of life following an operation like this is excellent. However, it was also noted that the survival rate is only 85%—death rate being 15% during this type of surgery. Because Rusty is a smaller dog, the survival rate is actually a bit lower. However, there was little data to suggest how much lower.

 

Making a decision about your pet’s health is a nerve-racking one, just as it is with your family. We did not want to delay. However, we did spend much time considering all of the objective data that we received from every doctor involved. We decided that surgery was not an option for us. Rusty, at the time, was ten and a half years old. We knew that the 15% death rate with this surgery was not going to be something we were interested in gambling on. Furthermore, according to the doctors with whom we spoke, and in doing additional personal research, we found that many dogs can live with adrenal tumors—and live a comfortable life.

 

After making this decision, we knew that our ultimate goal would be to make Rusty’s life comfortable and happy for however long he decided to stay on this earth. We began to research alternate approaches, including naturopathic remedies, as well as energy healing. As we embarked on this journey into using Eastern medicine as opposed to Western medicine, we learned a great deal from others. We utilized resources from the Abbeyrose Foundation, Mary Duafala, and Pam Allen.

 

We decided to contact the wonderful naturopathic doctor, Dr. Sandi Kuglics, ND. At the beginning of Rusty’s treatment, Dr. Sandi determined where Rusty’s body needed support and identified weaknesses in his immune system, in his circulatory system, in his nervous system, and in his digestive system. She recommended remedies that would heal all of these areas.

 

Additionally, we began treating Rusty with Reiki with our dear friend, Eileen Alexander. We began Reiki immediately after the initial diagnosis. Rusty initially received three Reiki sessions per week. Following each Reiki session, Eileen would report a shift in his energy. After a few months, we did not continue Reiki, as Rusty had made significant gains.

 

We did continue with his naturopathic remedies, for overall sustained health and to treat any mild issues that would arise. In early February, Dr. Sandi reported she did not believe Rusty still had his tumor.

 

During Rusty’s yearly veterinary visit, on July 12, 2014, we asked to have an ultrasound done to determine the status of Rusty’s adrenal gland. According to this new ultrasound, the adrenal tumor and right adrenal gland where the tumor had grown were necrotized (i.e., the tumor and gland had died and were dissolving) and his healthy left adrenal gland was enlarged. The tumor was gone! According to our veterinarian, the necrosis of the adrenal gland along with the adrenal tumor is expected when a tumor is treated using medical approaches, for example, chemotherapy and radiation. In addition, when an adrenal gland and tumor are removed surgically, the remaining adrenal gland often enlarges to compensate for the loss of the other adrenal gland. But, Rusty had had none of those procedures!

 

Rusty’s healing appears to be complete. He no longer has an adrenal tumor nor is he ill. At this point, Rusty has mild arthritis, but he is incredibly happy and healthy.

 

All of our experiences during this time with Rusty are of huge benefit to the animal and human communities, alike. It provides amazing hope and interest in using Eastern medicine along with, or in place of Western medicine to heal ourselves. Our bodies are meant to heal themselves, and by supporting our bodies at the cellular level, as we did with Rusty, we can combat chronic illness and disease.

 

RUSTY’S REIKI TREATMENT by Eileen Alexander, Reiki Master

Rusty is a welsh terrier and was 11 years old when he was diagnosed with a tumor on his right adrenal gland in July of 2013. Rusty’s parents immediately began to seek out holistic support in treating Rusty rather than opting for invasive treatment. I began treating Rusty with Reiki in August of 2013, in conjunction with remedies prescribed by another practitioner. Initially, Rusty was described by his parents as not being himself. He seemed somewhat lethargic, less playful and his spine was notably curved.

 

I treated Rusty over a period of approximately six months. Treatments took place weekly on an average, with several visits a week at some points and slightly larger gaps in frequency of treatment at other times. Each treatment lasted between 25 and 40 minutes. It should be noted that Rusty’s Dad became a Reiki Level 1 practitioner shortly after his diagnosis and treated Rusty himself in between my sessions.

 

Rusty was very receptive to Reiki. During the first treatments, it would take him a few minutes to settle in. I treated him in his own home, in a small enclosed sunroom that is used by his Dad as a meditation room and contained many healing crystals. His Dad joined us during the earlier sessions to calm him down. Rusty would run around the room while I sat still and sent Reiki to him, but then ultimately make his way to me and settled in for hands-on treatment.   Once he settled in, Rusty would lie still for long periods of time receiving treatment. At times he would change body position, guiding me to where he wanted my hands on his body. He would lie on the floor at times and crawl into my lap at other times. For a couple of months midway through treatment, during his sessions, his hind leg would often twitch and tremor.   This stopped toward the end of his treatment regimen. Much of Rusty’s Reiki treatment was targeted to his First (Root) Chakra and Third (Solar Plexus) Chakra. A bloodstone was used to support Rusty in calming and grounding him.

 

As treatment moved forward and Rusty became more and more “himself”, his energy centers balanced more quickly and the time that he sat for treatment in each session became shorter. Over time Rusty’s energy level increased significantly, his spine returned to normal and overall he began to look and act like a much younger dog.

 

In the last month or so of treatment Rusty had become more anxious due to the addition of an infant into the home. His parents had welcomed a beautiful baby girl into the world in October, 2013. Rusty was very protective of her, causing him to go into fight or flight mode very often as he sensed any activity outside the house. There was concern that this anxiety would have an adverse effect on his physical well-being. Much of the treatment during this time was focused on calming Rusty’s anxiety. In a short period of time Rusty’s anxiety settled and his health continued to improve.

 

I was thrilled to hear from Rusty’s parents his tumor was gone and that Rusty was in good health overall.

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Dog with a Job – Coyotes, Mountain Lions, and Annie

Dog with a Job – Coyotes, Mountain Lions, and Annie

This fall has been a very busy season. We welcomed another family member to our home, a red heeler mix named Annie. She is not being trained for anything at this time, but Kota is trying to teach her bad habits. We have not been able to work in the field this fall, but training has still been going on. There is a family group of coyotes living close to us, so there are plenty of opportunities to practice finding scents and scat. Kota has the other two dogs following him down the trails left by the coyotes in the snow and smelling all the scent posts and scat piles he finds. I know he isn’t purposely training the other two to find coyotes, but they are learning. We also have had the pleasure of having mountain lions close to the house this month. Annie is very afraid of them and will let me know immediately if she catches the scent of one. She might turn out to be better working with mountain lions than Kota, only time will tell.

DWJ sunset

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Work on natural products wins the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Work on natural products wins the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Work on natural products wins the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

The 2015 prize went to researchers for work that has revolutionized the treatment of parasitic diseases through the use of natural products. Parasitic diseases are a major global health concern that often affect the world’s poorest populations.

arf alternative_medicine

One half of the prize went to two researchers for their development of avermectin from a group of bacteria (Streptomyces) that live in the soil. Avermectin was modified to produce ivermectin.  Ivermectin is effective not only against parasites in domestic and farm animals, but is also effective in killing parasites in humans, such as those that cause River Blindness and Lymphatic Filariasis. Treatment of these conditions with ivermectin has been so successful, they are on the verge of eradication in some areas. However, River Blindness and Filariasis are far from eradicated in other areas, as they affect indigenous cultures living in very remote locations with difficult access. The ease of administration and relative safety of ivermectin make it feasible to deliver treatment to these remote areas and offer hope that these conditions might be fully eradicated over the next decade. Worldwide, it is estimated that at least 25 million people are infected with the parasite causing River Blindness, of which 300,000 are blind and 800,000 are visually impaired.

The other half of the prize went to a researcher who turned to a traditional herbal medicine to find a new cure for malaria. Her discovery, called artemisinin, has unprecedented potency against the malaria parasite and came at a time when the traditionally used treatments, chloroquine and quinine, were losing their effectiveness. Malaria affects nearly 200 million people yearly. When used in combination with other drugs, artemisinin reduces death from malaria by an estimated 20% overall and more than 30% in children. In Africa alone, that translates into more than 100,000 lives saved each year.

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Case Study – Chiropractic for Puppies

Case Study – Chiropractic for Puppies

I had the chance to adjust a litter of Welsh Terrier puppies that were a little over one month old recently. Surprisingly, there was a lot to work on. This is probably due to birth and puppy romping trauma as well as docking of the tails! I am showcasing the first part of the adjustment where you can see my exam protocol using Applied Kinesiology to check for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imbalance and tail docking scar treatment. So many good reasons to adjust the young ones!

Chiropractic ensures that the nervous system is functioning optimally by establishing correct motion in all the joints of the spine and body. When joints are not moving through their normal range of motion effectively, there is a loss of sensory perception input into the central nervous system and a corresponding loss of optimal nervous signaling to the muscles that allow for proper movement and function to the body. Simply put, chiropractic allows for the elimination of restrictions of motion which restores the healing potential of the nervous system. Trauma, use of the body, chemical and food stress, and emotional stress are some of the causes of loss of motion in the first place.

Case study provided by

Kevin Landau, DVM

Landau Veterinary Services, LLC

Belchertown, MA

Facebook: CLICK HERE

Puppy owned by

Anne Pelletier

Bremadog Welsh

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Dog with a Job – Kayaking with Jake

Dog with a Job – Kayaking with Jake

We moved and have been busy unpacking, but tonight I tried taking Jake in the kayak.

He loved it, for about 15 minutes, then he wanted out. I couldn’t keep Kota from following the kayak and trying to steal the paddle or climb in! In this photo they were torn between listening to my instruction to stay on the shore and trying to figure out how to get out to me. The picture doesn’t quite do the situation justice, as they were whining while standing there! We haven’t been out working lately, but both dogs are getting used to the coyotes howling every night at the new place.

DWJ Kota

Jake (left) and Kota (right)

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Dogs in Cancer Research

Dogs in Cancer Research

Research in dogs and cats with cancer may also aid in understanding human cancers.

The Morris Animal Foundation announced the launch of its Golden Retriever Lifetime Study in which 3000 dogs have been enrolled. They will be followed for at least 15 years in an attempt to identify risk factors for cancer and other diseases. Cancer is estimated to affect 60% of Golden Retrievers, but there is little good information on why and how it occurs. Owners and veterinarians of participating dogs will complete periodic questionnaires about the diet, activity, and health of the dog and provide blood samples. This and other research in cats and dogs will be used in an attempt to better understand cancer in humans. To read more about this research, go to http://caninelifetimehealth.org/  and http://www.fierceanimalhealth.com/story/vets-and-pharma-execs-gather-dc-trade-notes-pets-cancer-research/2015-06-17?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

Golden Retriever and cancer

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Dog with a Job – Kota gets a roommate

Dog with a Job – Kota gets a roommate

Meet Jake!

Jake, who was my mother’s dog, came to live with us after my mother passed away unexpectedly. Jake’s life has been turned upside down in more ways than one. He is adjusting to a more physically and socially active life and seems to be having fun doing so. Kota is teaching him lots, even how to find scat and alert me! Who said you can’t teach an older dog new tricks (Jake is 5)! Unfortunately Kota is also teaching him bad habits, like counter surfing. We are working on those bad habits while we continue to practice our tracking skills and get ready for field work.

 

Jake (foreground) and Kota

Jake (foreground) and Kota

Jake & Kota

Jake & Kota

 

 

 

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